SEE FOR YOURSELF: here is Spiva's October 28 column from beginning to end, along with a possible source for each passage.

Almost exact copying, not naming the original writer

Spiva paragraph 1:
    Most people take it for granted that when they purchase a home, rent an apartment, send their children to school, enter an office building or go into a public facility that the structure is safe. You don't expect the building to collapse on your head nor do you think about the danger of electrocution when you turn on a light switch or plug in an appliance. You assume the plumbing works properly and is not a health hazard. You expect heating, air conditioning and other mechanical systems to operate safely and efficiently. But safe buildings don't happen by chance.

Ron Nybo, a building official in Boulder City NV, wrote in the "Community Info" page at http://www.bcnv.org, dated October 4:
    Most people take it for granted that when they buy a home, rent an apartment, send their children to school, enter an office building or go into a public facility that the structure is safe. But safe buildings don’t happen by chance.
    "You don't expect the building to collapse on your head," says Nybo. "You don't think about the danger of electrocution when you turn on a light switch or plug in an appliance. You assume the plumbing works properly and is not a health hazard. You expect heating, air conditioning and other mechanical systems to operate safely and efficiently."

Almost exact copying, not naming the source

Spiva paragraph 2 opens:
    The purpose of a building code is to establish minimum requirements necessary to protect public health, safety and welfare in the built environment. Model building codes provide protection from tragedy caused by fire, structural collapse and general deteriorations. Safe buildings are achieved through proper design and construction practices in concert with a code administration program that ensures compliance. Model codes actually keep construction costs down by establishing uniformity in the construction industry. This uniformity permits building and materials manufacturers to do business on a larger scale statewide, regionally, nationally or internationally. This larger scale allows cost savings to be passed on to the consumer. Codes also help protect real estate investments, commercial and personal, by providing a minimum level of construction quality and safety.

The "Fact Sheet" of the "International Code Council," at
http://www.iccsafe.org/news/pdf/factssheet.pdf , includes:
    The purpose of a building code is to establish minimum requirements necessary to protect public health, safety and welfare in the built environment. Model building codes provide protection from tragedy caused by fire, structural collapse and general deterioration. Safe buildings are achieved through proper design and construction practices in concert with a code administration program that ensures compliance. Model codes actually keep construction costs down by establishing uniformity in the construction industry. This uniformity permits building and materials manufacturers to do business on a larger scale—statewide, regionally, nationally or internationally. Larger scale allows cost savings to be passed on to the consumer. Codes also help protect real estate investments, commercial and personal, by providing a minimum level of construction quality and safety.

Almost exact copying, not naming the source

Spiva paragraph 2 continues:
    Studies show that every dollar invested to build stronger and safer structures results in savings of $4 to $7 in reduced damages when a disaster occurs.

An International Code Council press release dated June 6, 2007, at http://www.iccsafe.org/news/nr/2007/0606grant.pdf , states:
    Studies show that every dollar invested to build stronger and safer results in savings of $4 to $7 in reduced damages when a disaster occurs.

Almost exact copying, not naming the source

Spiva paragraph 3 opens:
    America can boast it has the safest buildings in the world due largely to a cooperative effort between the International Code Council (ICC) and government officials who enforce building and fire safety codes, architects, engineers and the construction industry. Building safety codes save lives....

In the Nybo piece mentioned above, paragraph 3 opens:
    America can boast it has the safest buildings in the world due largely to a cooperative effort between the government officials who enforce building and fire safety codes, architects, engineers and the construction industry. Building safety codes save lives and protect personal and business investments in homes and buildings.

Almost exact copying, not naming the source

Spiva paragraph 3 continues:
    For example, countless lives have been saved and property damage reduced by smoke detectors alerting residents to fires. Bedroom windows of sufficient size to allow residents to escape in emergencies and provide access to rescue personnel are another safety factor included in building codes. Stair guardrails provide an obvious safety factor and protect children from getting their heads stuck between rails or falling through rails when guardrail spacing is enforced. Wind force resistance and seismic provisions in building codes are safeguards that protect people and property from natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes.

Wally Bailey, a code employee in Fort Smith, Arkansas, wrote a "letter to the editor" which was distributed as a press release by the International Code Council on August 29, 2007, at
http://www.iccsafe.org/news/nr/2007/0829editorial.html :
    Countless lives have been saved and property damage reduced by smoke detectors alerting residents to fires. Smoke detectors are required by building safety codes. Bedroom windows of sufficient size to allow residents to escape in emergencies and provide access to rescue personnel are another safety factor included in building codes. Stair guardrails provide a safety factor to protect children from getting their heads stuck between rails or falling through rails. Wind force resistance and seismic provisions in building codes are safeguards that protect people and property from natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes.

Exact copying, not naming the source

Spiva paragraph 4 begins:
    The primary incentive for communities to commit resources to ensure proper code enforcement should be to reduce loss of life, the risk of property loss, and economic and social disruption that result from natural catastrophes. Communities with good enforcement can expect commensurate reductions in property-insurance rates.

The Insurance Services Office, which provides risk information to insurance companies, has a page at http://www.isomitigation.com/bcegs/0000/bcegs0003.html which includes the following language:
    The primary incentive for communities to commit resources to ensure proper code enforcement should be to reduce loss of life, the risk of property loss, and economic and social disruption that result from natural catastrophes. Communities with good enforcement can expect commensurate reductions in property-insurance rates.

Very close paraphrasing, not crediting the source

Spiva paragraph 4 continues:
    Along with the building codes the Insurance Services Office (ISO) performs a Building Code Effectiveness Grading Schedule (BCEGS). ISO emphasizes building code requirements designed to mitigate losses from natural hazards. ISO develops classification for each community for insurance rating and underwriting purposes. Jurisdictions with effective, well-enforced codes should demonstrate better loss experience, and insurance rates can reflect that. The prospect of lessening catastrophe-related damage and ultimately lowering insurance costs provides an incentive for communities to enforce building codes rigorously especially as they relate to windstorms and seismic damage.

The Insurance Services Office website mentioned above includes, at http://www.isomitigation.com/bcegs/0000/bcegs0002.html , includes:
    BCEGS particularly emphasizes building-code requirements designed to mitigate losses from natural hazards. BCEGS develops a relative Building Code Effectiveness Classification for each community for insurance rating and underwriting purposes....
    The concept is simple: municipalities with effective, well-enforced codes should demonstrate better loss experience, and insurance rates can reflect that. The prospect of lessening catastrophe-related damage and ultimately lowering insurance costs provides an incentive for communities to enforce their building codes rigorously – especially as they relate to windstorms and seismic damage.

Very close paraphrasing, not crediting the source

Spiva paragraph 5:
    Today's building codes can be traced back to the Code of Hammurabi. Around 1780 B.C. King Hammurabi, King of Babylon, established the first Building Code in writing. His Code stated, "If a man builds a house badly, and it falls and kills the owner, the builder is to be slain. If the owner's son was killed, then the builder's son is slain". Contrary to some thoughts our modern day codes are not quite that strict. The first building codes in the United States, established in 1625, addressed fire safety and specified materials for roof coverings. In 1630, Boston outlawed chimneys made with wood and thatch roof coverings. In the late 1770's George Washington recommended that height and area limitations be imposed on wood frame buildings in his plans for the District of Columbia. In 1788, the first known formal building code was written in the United State in Old Salem, now Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

An International Code Council press release from January 2003, at http://www.iccsafe.org/news/nr/2003/030121consolidation.html , states:
    Today's building codes can be traced back to the Code of Hammurabi, circa 2200-1800 B.C. The Code of Hammurabi provided for the death of a builder if the construction of a dwelling collapsed and caused the death of the owner.
    The first building codes in the United States, established in 1625, addressed fire safety and specified materials for roof coverings. In 1630, Boston outlawed chimneys made with wood and thatch roof coverings. In the late 1770s George Washington recommended that height and area limitations be imposed on wood frame buildings in his plans for the District of Columbia. In 1788, the first known formal building code was written in the United States (in German) in Old Salem, (now Winston-Salem) North Carolina.

Exact copying, not naming the source

Spiva paragraph 6 opens:
    Larger U.S. cities began establishing building codes in the early 1800s. In 1865, New Orleans was the first city to enact a law requiring inspections of public places. The National Board of Fire Underwriters published its Recommended National Building Code in 1905. In 1915, the world's first model code organization was established to provide a forum for exchange of ideas regarding building safety and construction regulations.

The January 2003 press release quoted just above includes:
    Larger U.S. cities began establishing building codes in the early 1800s. In 1865, New Orleans was the first city to enact a law requiring inspections of public places. The National Board of Fire Underwriters published its Recommended National Building Code in 1905. In 1915, the world's first model code organization was established to provide a forum for exchange of ideas regarding building safety and construction regulations....

The three closing sentences appear to be original with Spiva

Spiva paragraph 6 continues: Today we have the International Code Council who have developed a model code which is being used in fifty states and the District of Columbia.

Spiva paragraph 7: Remember the old adage, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". Building codes represent an ounce of prevention.

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